Mercer Chair
Mercer Chair
Chair Crest
Chair Crest

It has come to our attention that a Glasgow museum, Provand’s Lordship, has on exhibit a 17th century chair with an apparent connection to the Mercers of Perth. From the style of its construction the chair is thought to have been crafted in Aberdeen. The back has an elaborately carved coat of arms on the back and the initials H.M at the top. It is thought that H.M. is probably the initials of the family member to whom the chair belonged. The arms carved on the chairback are of the style dated to 1565. No one having the initials H.M around that time period, has been identified.

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Mercer Chair

One thought on “Mercer Chair

  • 22/October/2020 at 10:59 am
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    Dear Jim,

    good to “hear” from you. Hopefully this message finds you well!

    Thank you so much for the interesting hint concerning this chair. If it was made in Aberdeen perhaps there was a link to Henry Mercer, younger son of the 8th laird (cf. redbookofscotland.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Mercer-of-Aldie.pdf#page=10). That Henry died after 1588 and had a charter for the lands of Banchory-Devenick near Aberdeen in 1580 from his presumable uncle Robert Mercer, canon of Aberdeen (and minister of Banchory-Devenick). Thus, Henry was at least partially linked to Aberdeenshire.

    What might be of interest is that at Trinity Hall in Aberdeen there still exists another chair from the late 1500s with the Mercer coat of arms and the letters “LM”, a drawing of which can be seen here: https://archive.org/details/merchantcraftgui00bainuoft/page/176/mode/2up. This chair was obviously gifted by saddler Laurence Mercer who was often deacon of the hammermen’s guild in Aberdeen between 1572 and 1596.

    Best greetings from Berlin,

    Kai

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